Marc Levinson’s selective education

Levinson’s inability to perform a Bohm-Bawerk grade undermining of Schiller is shameful and the attempt appalling

Marc Levinson’s article, linked below, offers details about the post WWII “golden age” which are thorough for casual interest readers to understand and to gain insight as to events which may have cause and effect relationship related to modern economic conditions and how to proceed. However there were key places Levinson chose to selectively not educate the reader. One, he fails to discuss financing the “golden age” with taxes on income 25x poverty levels. Though realistically everyone paid higher rates to help finance the needs and support structures he thoroughly describes as essential to the success during that period. Continue reading Marc Levinson’s selective education

So, more on how my parents never cared about me because I decided I wasn’t done.

You are not alone in this world. Much love and support!!

Mal on Wire

My parents also had almost no involvement in my dating life. I didn’t really start dating until I was eighteen years old. I had three sort of cutesy, puppy love relationships before that, though. My parents only found out about one of those, when I was in sixth grade. My mom used to go through my stuff and she found some silly little love note to this boy I liked. The punishment was severe. I wasn’t allowed to use the phone or see my friends outside of school for a month. She never asked me any questions about my relationship with this boy. She never asked if we kissed or held hands. If she had, she would have found out that we were both so shy that all we managed to do was pass notes to each other.

I never got “the talk” from my parents. Sex was never addressed in…

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Upcoming Release

In preparation for the sequel to Final Collection due out mid-March, new pricing is set at Smashwords. Price adjustments will take effect at itunes and Barnes&Noble shortly but please enjoy samples and purchase the full copy before the release of Phoenix Falls.

Phoenix Falls – Eva returns and leads new companion Edgar in a search for stability as she makes contact with Adam uniting in defiance of the great rising. Community 4701 is poised and unstoppable however Eva’s knowledge and time as a collector gives her distinct advantage against many foes. Will Edgar’s companionship be enough to keep Eva from roguish chaos and self-destruction?

Final Collection is book one of the planned trilogy.

Please enjoy Final Collection today and happy reading!!

Final Collection

itunes

Barnes&Noble

Smashwords

Placebo Goods (There is nothing but profit in the basket)

Okay this is an exceptional thirty-four page download to read and review regarding export and derivatively global business strategy. Thanks to r/economics for this nugget of intellectual activity.

I found myself oscillating between ‘yep’ and ‘uggh’ trying to determine my ethical integrity when it comes to trade and trade law. Outcome: I’m not cut-throat from behind.

The article certainly paints a bleak picture for American greed based Capitalism cannibalizing itself thanks to being outwitted by the global community.

However should the consumer financially survive – a more pure, not quite laissez faire, Capitalism can thrive and reintroduce consumers to actual goods and choice rather than what, after reading this, I would effectively call placebo goods.

Lessons from German Housing?

IPPR has recently been producing a series of reports on housing in Germany asking why can’t the UK follow in its stead and take on some of the apparently desirable features of their housing …

Source: Lessons from German Housing?

Forecasting GDP during and after the Great Recession

OECD ECOSCOPE

by Patrice Ollivaud, Economist, OECD Economics Department,  Pierre-Alain Pionnier, Head of Unit, OECD Statistics Directorate and Cyrille Schwellnus, Senior Economist, OECD Economics Department

How was it possible not to see the Great Recession of 2008-09 coming? How could economic forecasters blindly ignore financial developments? These are typical questions asked by the media in the wake of the Great Recession.

The OECD has drawn a number of lessons from the failure to forecast the Great Recession for the monitoring and statistical modelling of near-term economic developments. Crucially, a broader range of information, including financial developments, is now accounted for in OECD forecasts (Lewis and Pain, 2014). In an attempt to systematise this approach, OECD economists have recently estimated state-of-the-art statistical models that allow extracting meaningful signals from a large set of economic indicators, including equity and credit market indicators, real estate and consumer prices, disaggregate industrial production, as well…

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Why aren’t more Pro-Life advocates Vegetarian?

Do you really need an explanation? Not going to happen, but check this out please – this is my meal planning I live on breakfast 😀 and for breakfast I have one of two meal options: 1st) Butt…

Source: Why aren’t more Pro-Life advocates Vegetarian?

Generation X defers loss of subsidized savings accounts

Despite unified recommendations from 101 economists, reminiscent of service puppies for public administrators, the 2018 Cadillac Tax has been deferred to 2020. Among these economists was 2015 Nobel Prize winner Angus Deaton. The opening statement from health economists and policy analysts, addressing senators and representatives, cited the unlimited exclusion from income and payroll taxes as being economically inefficient and regressive. The statement concluded that without the Cadillac Tax, government subsidized healthcare would be inevitable.

General public criticism of the Cadillac Tax is that more Americans will be uninsured. However, professional analysis by Moody’s Investor Services indicates that healthcare payer participation will increase as a result of the Cadillac Tax.

As the tax reads, individuals and employers not moving to lower-cost plans will be progressively included into a 40% tax rate. However, the tax is not designed to raise revenues to cover healthcare costs, it is designed to influence greater participation in lower-cost plans which reduces premiums and overall healthcare costs. These reductions allow participation from uninsured individuals, effectively reducing healthcare costs twice.

Without the Cadillac Tax’s design (lower-cost plans and increased participation), healthcare costs will inflate at least $4000 by 2028. In 2013, per capita healthcare expenditures were over $9000, when the poverty line income was only double that amount. That same year, 14.5% of Americans were impoverished. Greater participation from this group, first quintile earners, is necessary to reduce inflationary costs attributed to low participation and bad-debt, of which the latter efficiently increases both direct costs and premiums.

Third through fifth quintile earners in high-cost plans must shift to low-cost plans in order to increase affordability for first quintile earners and their participation. The reason for this, as previously explained, is to prevent the $4000 increases on current participants which would effectively reduce payer participation.

The Cadillac Tax, as noted by the economists, will remove healthcare Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) from healthcare plans. FSAs, generally owned by third through fifth quintile earners, act as a government subsidized savings accounts. FSAs are tax free, a $750 savings per year, and allow for accrual of interest to providers. This regressively pays upper quintile earners for having money in the FSA, especially when compared to a traditional savings account ($25 earned per year). Neither of these accounts are likely owned by the uninsured, notably the lower quintile earners, and the savings from FSAs will be outpaced by inflationary increases.

The Cadillac Tax allows the stability designed within the Affordable Care Act to progress efficiently and to non-governmentally finance healthcare. Financing affordable healthcare has been generationally deferred. As the 2020 deadline approaches, and with 80% of Boomers having insufficient financing for healthcare, this is undoubtedly the reason economists implore the U.S. to provide more affordable healthcare.

Sources:

http://www.cbpp.org/sites/default/files/atoms/files/cadillac_tax_letter.pdf

https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-249.pdf

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.XPD.PCAP

http://www.mwe.com/info/pubs/Moodys_032714.pdf